Tuesday, June 4, 2013

John Snowdon and Son's Vulcan Iron and Machine Works: 2013 Field Season

Hello Everyone,

           It sure has been a while since my last post, and much has been going on. For one, we reached above and beyond our Kickstarter goal raising over $1700! That allowed us to buy the required liability insurance and some much needed tools to continue excavations at the Snowdon and Son's Foundry. The second thing that has been going on is the excavation, with the help of volunteers. I'll briefly refresh everyone why the foundry is important not only locally, but nationally as well. 
           The Vulcan Iron and Machine Works has a rich history in our nation's early industrialization. It patterned and cast the first iron bridge in the United States, the Dunlap Creek Bridge in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. The foundry cast the half of the iron obelisk markers on the National Road, now Route 40. The foundry also built numerous steamboats and stationary steam engines some of which were used in the Mexican American War. 
           I want to share the first weeks field season photos with you, and hope you enjoy them.









2 comments:

  1. Fantastic! Keep up the good work!

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  2. Hello!

    I am Adrià Millán, director of archaeoBarcelona, an affiliated institution at University of Barcelona. We offer archaeology fieldwork. We also give university credit in arrangement of each participant’s college. To know about our current projects take you can take a look at http://www.archaeoBarcelona.com

    Our current project is La Roca dels Bous (Neanderthals), Spain, which is part of the European Project POCTEFA, where we are using innovative technology in the world of archaeology (using laser and PDA to place the pieces, and labeling using QR codes, which reduces de tipical labelling mistakes to a only 1%. People can take a interactive visit through the project website, I give the site for all those how may be interested in this project: http://larocadelsbous.uab.cat/en

    There’s also an archaeological park and a interpretation center, where people can practice experimental archaeology through workshops.

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